Unbalanced Youth Justice

The Burns Institute is in pursuit of an equitable and excellent youth justice system. A system used sparingly and appropriately.  We know that our current youth justice system is not equitable, excellent, or used sparingly and appropriately. More than 47,000 youth were incarcerated on any given night in 2015, most (73 percent) for non-violent offenses. The majority (69 percent) of those incarcerated were youth of color.  Learn more »

Use the tools below to explore this issue »

One-day count

Data in this section show how many youth are detained, committed, or otherwise sleeping somewhere other than their homes per orders of the court on "any given day" in select years. Data is available for the nation and on a state-by-state basis, and are based upon one-day counts of youth in residential placement facilities conducted in 1997, 1999, 2001, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2010, 2011, 2013, and 2015. Learn more »

Show table and download this data

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Year White Black Latino Native American Asian Other All youth of color All youth

Annual decision points

This section includes data at nine key juvenile justice annual decision points. Data are available at the county and state-level, but only for counties that report. This section allows you to view the data from many different angles and all of the data is broken down by race and ethnicity. Learn more »

Year

Data not available for every year. (Why?)

Available years are those for which states have submitted data to OJJDP. States do not submit data on an annual basis.

Case flow diagram

Click on a decision-making point to see the data for that point. Click additional decision-making points to the graph to compare.

  1. Youth population

  • 1Comparison of arrest to population is rate per 1,000 youth. All other annual decision points are rate per 100 youth at the prior decision-making point.
  • 2Due to differences in how states define arrests and referrals to court, some states may have more referrals to court than arrests.
Show table and download this data

Click column headers to sort Download

Decision White Black Latino American Indian or Alaskan Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander Asian Other All youth of color All youth

8 of 36 counties (Why?)

Originally, states were only required to examine three counties: those with the greatest proportions of minority youth within their juvenile population, as well as those that contained the greatest numbers of minority youth. Only recently has OJJDP required that states track DMC data for all potential DMC reduction sites on a regular basis (at least every 3 years). If a county is not a DMC reduction site, data may not be available.

Detention statute

Juvenile courts may hold delinquents in a secure detention facility if the court believes it is in the best interest of the community or the child. After arrest a youth is often brought to the local juvenile detention facility by law enforcement. Juvenile probation officers or detention workers review the case and decide if the juvenile should be held pending a hearing by a judge.

Jurisdiction ages

  • 0–17
  • Extended Age of Delinquency Jurisdiction: 24

Age of detention

12–17

Standard for detention

(1) A youth may be held or placed in detention before adjudication on the merits if one or more of the following circumstances exists:

(a) The youth is a fugitive from another jurisdiction;

(b) The youth is alleged to be within the jurisdiction of the court under ORS 419C.005, by having committed or attempted to commit an offense which, if committed by an adult, would be chargeable as:

(A) A crime involving infliction of physical injury to another person;

(B) A misdemeanor under ORS 166.023; or

(C) Any felony crime;

(c) The youth has willfully failed to appear at one or more juvenile court proceedings by having disobeyed a proper summons, citation or subpoena;

(d) The youth is currently on probation imposed as a consequence of the youth previously having been found to be within the jurisdiction of the court under ORS 419C.005, and there is probable cause to believe the youth has violated one or more of the conditions of that probation;

(e) The youth is subject to conditions of release pending or following adjudication of a petition alleging that the youth is within the jurisdiction of the court pursuant to ORS 419C.005 and there is probable cause to believe the youth has violated a condition of release;

(f) The youth is alleged to be in possession of a firearm in violation of ORS 166.250; or

(g) The youth is required to be held or placed in detention for the reasonable protection of the victim.

Detention hearing timeline

Or. Rev. Stat. § 419C.139.

Within 36 hours, excluding Saturdays, Sundays and judicial holidays, except on order of the court.

Contact

Please email Anna Wong with any updates to contact information for your DMC coordinator, JJS coordinator, or DMC subcommittee chair.

DMC coordinator

Anya Sekino
Cultural Competency and Disproportionate Minority Contact (DMC) Coordinator
Oregon Commission on Children and Families
530 Center Street NE
Suite 405
Salem, OR 97301-3754
Phone: 503-378-5115
Fax: 503-378-8395
anya.sekino@state.or.us

Website

JJS coordinator

Anya Sekino
Cultural Competency and Disproportionate Minority Contact (DMC) Coordinator
Oregon Commission on Children and Families
530 Center Street NE
Suite 405
Salem, OR 97301-3754
Phone: 503-378-5115
Fax: 503-378-8395
anya.sekino@state.or.us

DMC subcommittee chair

Anya Sekino

Reform efforts

States that wish to post their most recent three-year plans or share other relevant publications about their reform work should contact Anna Wong. We would be happy to link to relevant documents and information.

DMC reform efforts

State plan

There is no link available to the current State Plan

The State Plan has a large focus of gang intervention and prevention

2012 Assessment report

State Advisory Group (SAG)

The Youth Development Council (YDC) was established by House Bill 4165 in 2012 to assist the Oregon Education Investment Board in overseeing a unified system that provides services to school-age children through youth 20 years of age in a manner that supports academic success, reduces criminal involvement and is integrated, measurable and accountable.

The council prioritizes funding for prevention and intervention services related to gang violence and gang involvement; determines the means by which services to children and youth may be provided effectively and efficiently across multiple programs to improve the academic and social outcomes of children and youth; assesses state programs and services related to youth development and training, and identifies methods by which programs and services may be coordinated or consolidated.

Legislation also requires that the YDC establish common academic and social indicators to support attainment of goals established by the Oregon Education Investment Board; establish common program outcome measurements and coordinate data collection across multiple programs and services; ensure implementation of best practices that are evidence based, culturally, gender and age appropriate, address individual risk factors, build upon factors that increase the health and well being of children and youth, and include tribal best practices.

SAG chair

Matt Morton
Executive Director
Native American Youth and Family Center
5135 NE Columbia Blvd.
Portland, OR 97218
Phone: 503-288-8177, ext201
Fax: 503-288-1260
matthewm@nayapdx.org

Best to contact through:
Brenda Brooks
Deputy Director
Youth Development Council
Division of Oregon Department of Education
775 Court St NE
Salem, OR 97301
Phone: 503-378-5129
Business Cell: 971-273-3835

Website

Organizational structure

The council consists of no fewer than 15 members who are appointed by the Governor. The membership of the council must satisfy federal requirements for membership of a state advisory committee on juvenile justice, and includes tribal representation.

Committees

  • Educational Supports/Developmental Assets
  • Employment,Internships/Career Development
  • Juvenile Justice, Prevention/Intervention
  • Research Evaluation & Data
  • State Agencies Serving Youth

Membership

  • Brenda Frank
  • William Feyerherm
  • Jay Dixon
  • David Fullerton
  • Janet Arenz
  • Jaime Arrendondo
  • Agnes Balassa
  • Martha Brooks
  • Blanca Gutierrez
  • Frank Hanna-Williams
  • Alicia Hays
  • Martha Doyle
  • Faye Fagel
  • Renee Hernandez
  • Ted Martinez
  • Meghan Moyer
  • Brian Pham
  • Lolenzo Poe
  • Tim Sinatra
  • John Teague

About the data

Our website is populated by data provided to us by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP). Continue reading for details about the One-day count and Annual decision points data.

Download

Complete downloads of the data are available in several formats:

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Each table of data is also available for download. Click Show table below any table to download just the data shown.