Unbalanced Youth Justice

The Burns Institute is in pursuit of an equitable and excellent youth justice system. A system used sparingly and appropriately.  We know that our current youth justice system is not equitable, excellent, or used sparingly and appropriately. More than 47,000 youth were incarcerated on any given night in 2015, most (73 percent) for non-violent offenses. The majority (69 percent) of those incarcerated were youth of color.  Learn more »

Use the tools below to explore this issue »

One-day count

Data in this section show how many youth are detained, committed, or otherwise sleeping somewhere other than their homes per orders of the court on "any given day" in select years. Data is available for the nation and on a state-by-state basis, and are based upon one-day counts of youth in residential placement facilities conducted in 1997, 1999, 2001, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2010, 2011, 2013, and 2015. Learn more »

Show table and download this data

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Year White Black Latino Native American Asian Other All youth of color All youth

Annual decision points

This section includes data at nine key juvenile justice annual decision points. Data are available at the county and state-level, but only for counties that report. This section allows you to view the data from many different angles and all of the data is broken down by race and ethnicity. Learn more »

Year

Data not available for every year. (Why?)

Available years are those for which states have submitted data to OJJDP. States do not submit data on an annual basis.

Case flow diagram

Click on a decision-making point to see the data for that point. Click additional decision-making points to the graph to compare.

  1. Youth population

  • 1Comparison of arrest to population is rate per 1,000 youth. All other annual decision points are rate per 100 youth at the prior decision-making point.
  • 2Due to differences in how states define arrests and referrals to court, some states may have more referrals to court than arrests.
Show table and download this data

Click column headers to sort Download

Decision White Black Latino American Indian or Alaskan Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander Asian Other All youth of color All youth

14 of 93 counties (Why?)

Originally, states were only required to examine three counties: those with the greatest proportions of minority youth within their juvenile population, as well as those that contained the greatest numbers of minority youth. Only recently has OJJDP required that states track DMC data for all potential DMC reduction sites on a regular basis (at least every 3 years). If a county is not a DMC reduction site, data may not be available.

Detention statute

Juvenile courts may hold delinquents in a secure detention facility if the court believes it is in the best interest of the community or the child. After arrest a youth is often brought to the local juvenile detention facility by law enforcement. Juvenile probation officers or detention workers review the case and decide if the juvenile should be held pending a hearing by a judge.

Jurisdiction ages

  • 0–17
  • Extended Age of Delinquency Jurisdiction: 18

Standard for detention

The goal of the Coalition is to improve all aspects of the juvenile justice system in the State of Nebraska by assisting communities and the state with planning and implementation of systemic improvements, advocacy, education and recommending award of JJDP Act funds for such purposes. The purpose of the Coalition is to improve the lives and future of children, youth and families involved in the juvenile justice system.

Detention hearing timeline

24 hour excluding weekends and holidays

(43-250. Temporary custody; disposition; custody requirements..c.vi) A status offender or nonoffender taken into temporary custody shall not be held in a secure area of a jail or other facility intended or used for the detention of adults. Until January 1, 2013, a status offender accused of violating a valid court order may be securely detained in a juvenile detention facility longer than twentyfour hours if he or she is afforded a detention hearing before a court within twenty-four hours, excluding nonjudicial days, and if, prior to a dispositional commitment to secure placement, a public agency, other than a court or law enforcement agency, is afforded an opportunity to review the juvenile's behavior and possible alternatives to secure placement and has submitted a written report to the court.

Contact

Please email Anna Wong with any updates to contact information for your DMC coordinator, JJS coordinator, or DMC subcommittee chair.

DMC coordinator

Derek Jones
Nebraska Crime Commission
301 Centennial Mall South
P.O. box 94946
Lincoln Nebraska 68509-4946
402-471-3989
derek.jones@nebraska.gov

There is no DMC website

JJS coordinator

Cindy Gans
Nebraska Crime Commission
P.O. Box 94946
301 Centennial Mall South
Lincoln, NE 68509
Phone: 402-471-3998
Cindy.Gans@nebraska.gov

DMC subcommittee chair

Symone Sanders
Phone: 402-671-8118
symonesanders12@gmail.com

Reform efforts

States that wish to post their most recent three-year plans or share other relevant publications about their reform work should contact Anna Wong. We would be happy to link to relevant documents and information.

DMC reform efforts

  • Updated DMC Identification Spreadsheets
  • Juvenile Detention Alternative Initiative
  • Douglas County was awarded a grant from the Burns Institute to host community engagement events around DMC. The purpose of the technical assistance was to develop a long-term plan for community partner engagement for addressing racial disparities
  • The Administrative Office of the Courts, together with the Minority Justice Committee, is in the process of developing a survey for justice system stakeholders and focus group discussions with limited English proficient populations to assess ways to improve the provision of interpreter services.
  • Currently collect RRI on only 1 of our 10 most diverse counties.

State plan

2012–2014 3-year plan

State Advisory Group (SAG)

The goal of the Coalition is to improve all aspects of the juvenile justice system in the State of Nebraska by assisting communities and the state with planning and implementation of systemic improvements, advocacy, education and recommending award of JJDP Act funds for such purposes. The purpose of the Coalition is to improve the lives and future of children, youth and families involved in the juvenile justice system.

SAG chair

Mark Benne
Staff Secure Facility Director
Northeast Juvenile Services
P.O. Box 50
Madison, NE 68748
Phone: 402-454-3955
safety@cableone.net
Website

Organizational structure

The Nebraska Coalition for Juvenile Justice (NCJJ) was established in 1982, as required by the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act. The NCJJ acts as an advisory group to the Nebraska Crime Commission, and is responsible for making recommendations for federal JJDP Act and JAIBG funding. Additionally, the group members assist in developing the comprehensive three year plan, monitor existing juvenile justice programs and issues, and advocate to improve the system and educate others on juvenile justice issues. Members are appointed by the Governor and represent a broad cross section of citizens and professionals.

Committees

DMC, Grants, Youth

Membership

  • Cassandra Rockwell, Youth Member
  • Michael Behm, Crime Commission Executive Director
  • Bill Brueggmann, County Sheriff Plattsmouth
  • Amanda Speichert, Public Defender, North Platte
  • Derek Vaughn, Crime Commission, Omaha
  • Brett Matthies, Youth Member, Omaha
  • Judge Kent Turnbull, County Judge, North Platte
  • Kara Brostrom, Youth Member,Grand Island
  • Nola Bennett, Nonprofit District 1,Lincoln
  • Symone Sanders, Youth Member, Omaha
  • Tony Green, Juvenile Services Director, Lincoln
  • Rachel Elston, Youth Member, Lincoln
  • Corey Steel, Probation Administration, Lincoln
  • Elaine Menzel, Association of County Officials, Lincoln,
  • Janteice Holston, Youth Member Grand Island
  • Judge Reggie Ryder, Lincoln
  • Kay Glidden, Mental Health, Kearney
  • Denise Kracl, County Attorney, Colfax
  • Neleigh Korth, HHS Rep, Lincoln
  • Chris Rodgers, County Commissioner, Omaha
  • Dan Scarborough, YRTC Geneva
  • Daniel L Lynch, Kearney
  • Jennie Cole-Mossman, Youth Counselor, Lincoln
  • Judge Vernon Daniels, Juvenile Court Judge, Omaha
  • Scott Swisher, Education, Lincoln
  • Ron Johns, Secure Youth, Gering
  • Vanessa Sherman, Alternatives to Youth Detention, Nebraska City
  • Patrick Garcia, Nonprofit District 3, York

About the data

Our website is populated by data provided to us by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP). Continue reading for details about the One-day count and Annual decision points data.

Download

Complete downloads of the data are available in several formats:

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Each table of data is also available for download. Click Show table below any table to download just the data shown.